2020 Census

The U.S. Census counts every resident in the United States. As mandated by the U.S. Constitution, America gets just one chance each decade to count its population. The results of the census determine the number of seats for each state in the U.S. House of Representatives and are used to draw congressional and state legislative districts. Federal agencies use the results to distribute more than $675 billion in federal funds each year.

Why the Census is Important

Representation
Census data determines the number of seats each state has in the U.S. House of Representatives, as well as districts for state government.

Funding
Census data guides federal spending allocation of approximately $589 billion to local communities every year.

Planning
Census data helps plan roads, schools, hospitals, senior centers, and emergency services to best serve changing populations.

Business
Census data assists businesses in locating factories & stores, recruiting employees, and conducting market research.

How the 2020 Census will Invite Everyone to Respond

Every household will have the option to respond by responding online, by mail, or by phone.  Nearly every household will receive an invitation to participate in the 2020 Census from either a postal worker or a census worker.

2020 Census Fact Sheet: How Census Invites Everyone

Address Canvassing to Start in August 2019; What is address canvassing?
Address canvassing is the process by which the U.S. Census Bureau validates, corrects, or deletes existing Census Bureau addresses, adds missing addresses, and adds or corrects locations of specific addresses before a decennial census. In previous address canvassing operations, field representatives traversed every road and visited each residential address in the United States. At this time, only select addresses will be canvassed. Census Bureau employees will not be asking for information about individuals but rather about addresses and habitable locations.

How to verify employment
We realize that Census workers may draw the attention of residents or law enforcement personnel who are concerned about the presence of strangers in their neighborhoods. Each temporary decennial Census employee will have an official identification card with the employees name, picture, and an expiration date. Regional level staff can be identified by their Personal Identity Verification (PIV) Card. Both temporary and regional level staff can be identified by their laptop computer with a Census Bureau logo on the top, and a black canvas bag with a Census Bureau logo.

TO VERIFY AN EMPLOYEE WITH THIS TYPE OF ID:
Chicago Regional Census Center
175 West Jackson Blvd., Suite 600
Chicago, IL 60604
1-312-579-1500

Brockton Lane Reconstruction

Project Overview

The City of Medina and the City of Plymouth are working together to make improvements to Brockton Lane from Medina Road to Hamel Road. This project will include full reconstruction of the street and converting it from a rural to an urban design to accommodate recent growth, as well as the addition of a trail, turn lanes, utility, and drainage improvements.

Project Elements

  • Additional pedestrian facilities including a trail on the east side
  • Storm sewer improvements
  • Concrete curb and gutter installation
  • New pavement
  • Intersection improvements
  • Parking near Hamel Legion Park

Traffic Impacts

The project will be completed in three main stages. Updates on the timeline will posted as the project moves through each stage (Updated 8-16-19)

  • Stage 1 (44th Ave North to Medina Rd) – complete
  • Stage 2 (Medina Road/Brockton Ln intersection)- began 7/23 – utility construction currently underway – paving of intersection scheduled at the same time as Brockton Lane base paving
  • Stage 3 (Hamel Rd to 44th Ave North)- TBD

Each stage will be closed to traffic while under construction, as well as access points along the construction area. Local access will be maintained for those directly served by Brockton Lane.

For More Information

For questions about the project, contact project manager Josh Eckstein at Joshec@bolton-menk.com

Brockton Lane Newsletter

More information can also be on the City of Plymouth’s website

No-Wake Restriction on Lake Independence

The City of Medina in accordance with Section 512 of the City Code notifies the public of the enforcement of the No-Wake restriction on Lake Independence because the water level for the Lake has been higher than 957.8 feet above sea level for at least three consecutive days.

You can monitor up-to-date water levels on Lake Independence at this link: https://www.lakeindependence.org/water-info

City’s Compost/Brush Site

Residents may drop off brush or compost Tuesday through Thursday from 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. (except holidays) and Friday 7 a.m. to Monday 3:30 p.m. (open all weekend during daylight hours).

It is located behind the shop building northwest of City Hall, 2052 County Road 24, Medina, MN 55340.

Accepted Items

Brush Pile – brush, woody shrubs, vines, Christmas trees & large logs

Compost Pile – leaves and grass clippings (no bags & no straw)

[Read more…]

Medina’s Parks & Trails Need Your Feedback

Create your own user feedback survey

FEMA Updates Flood Hazard Maps

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) recently completed a multiyear project to re-examine flood risks throughout Hennepin County and develop electronic flood hazard maps, which will become effective on November 4, 2016.

Federal law mandates that any federally regulated or insured lender require any property with a structure within the Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) on these maps to carry flood insurance.

Most mortgage lenders will check their loans when the updated maps become effective on November 4, 2016. Lenders will likely send a letter to all properties in SFHA, and other properties that are even close to the SFHA, to notify them that they must purchase flood insurance within 45 days. If a policy is not purchased within this time period, the lender will “force place” a policy, which is normally much more expensive.

Flood insurance is available through your agent or one of the agents listed by searching the “Agent Finder” section of FEMA’s Flood Insurance website, FloodSmart.gov. If you have any kind of risk for flood damages, both in or out of the floodplain, the city encourages you to purchase flood insurance.

If you live near a lake, stream, or large wetland, you are encouraged to investigate whether your property may be “newly mapped” within the SFHA. View the floodplain map  to find your property on the map.

What to do if you believe you’ve been inadvertently included in the Special Flood Hazard Areas (SFHA)?

There are often scenarios where the boundaries of the floodplain do not accurately reflect the true topographic characteristics of a site. In addition, it is likely that lenders will be fairly conservative when determining if a property may require flood insurance.

In much of the county, the boundaries of the floodplain have not been updated with better elevation information since they were originally mapped in the early 1980’s. This newest map update merely digitized these areas – making them easier for everyone to view. If you believe your structure and/or parcel is higher than the actual flood elevation, there is a procedure for appeals known as a Letter of Map Amendment (LOMA). Traditionally, a LOMA involves hiring a surveyor to verify the lowest ground touching the structure, deck or stairs is above the 100-year flood elevation.

Under the right circumstances, the city may be able to assist with collecting data rather than hiring a surveyor. City staff may be able to use LiDAR-derived contour elevations from the Minnesota DNR to verify that a structure is above the 100-year flood elevation.

If you have any questions, please contact City Planner Dusty Finke at 763-473-8846 or dusty.finke@ci.medina.mn.us.

 

Monarchs & Milkweed

young-milkweedThe Monarch Butterfly Population

The Monarch butterfly populations have plummeted by as much as 90% in the past 20 years and are on the cusp of moving toward protection on the Endangered Species Act.

One of the primary reasons for this decline is the decrease in milkweed plants, which grow easily in Minnesota. Monarch butterflies lay their eggs on the underside of the milkweed plant and it is the only source of food for the monarch caterpillar. If you have milkweed growing in your yards and fields, please don’t pull it, and let it grow. Planting milkweed is one of the easiest ways that we can make a difference for the monarchs.

Residents that are interested in planting milkweed in their yards to help the Monarch butterflies can pick up a bag of seeds, free of charge, while supplies last, at City Hall, 2052 County Road 24, Medina, MN 55340 during regular business hours M-F 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Additional resources on the Monarch Butterfly can be found below:

https://monarchjointventure.org/resources – View a number of publications on Monarchs and Milkweed

http://www.learner.org/jnorth/monarchs – This organization was started by Karen Oberhauser at the U of M who has studied the Monarchs for years

https://www.nwf.org/sitecore/content/Home/Garden-for-Wildlife/About/National-Initiatives/Pollinators – The National Wildlife Federation explains the importance of milkweed.

https://www.saveourmonarchs.org/ – This organization is out of Edina, MN, and is working to provide milkweed seeds for planting. The site also does a great job of explaining the importance of milkweed.

 

Links for Purchasing Bulk Milkweed Seeds

https://www.prairiemoon.com/seeds/

http://www.prairieresto.com

https://www.saveourmonarchs.org/